Equine Test FAQs

I am Dr. Steven Hadaway. Our licensed Veterinary Lab has performed tests for worms in horses and all livestock for 15 years. Our low cost, accurate test kits are sold on our own website (www.perfectpetproducts.com), Amazon, Valley Vet, Horse.com, TackShop, TABCOM, RJMathews, Petco, and many others. Our worm tests and those of Vet schools demonstrate that in most farms 40-50% of horses are negative for worms, therefore do not need a potentially hazardous wormer. In addition 10-17% of horses are resistant to the most common wormers. So in 50-67% of the horses you are wasting your money by trying to guess what is the best wormer to use. If you do not test prior to worming you have no idea what to use or if the wormer worked. The reason drug companies suggest that you rotate thru 4 different wormers is because without testing no one knows what to use, or how often. If only one of the 4 wormers that you choose in your rotation does eliminate the worms and the wormer lasts only 1-2 months before the horse is reinfested, then your horse is infested with worms for 10 of the 12 months each year. Just think about this and your horse and your feed bill. Worms rob your horse of nutrients and cost you more in feed. Save 10 to 20% on your feed bill when you elimate worms. Most horse owners that test and follow our program have horses that remain negative for worms for years and no longer need routine dewormers. Perfect Pet Products AT HOME test is the ONLY way to answer these questions. Use this test to KNOW if your horse has worms, which worms, the level of infestation, and which wormer to use, and did the wormer work. You can contact Dr. Hadaway at the contact page

We offer volume discounts to 4-H Clubs, Stables, Kennels, Rescue Clubs, etc.

Why do fecal testing vs. just deworming?  
When should you employ a fecal examination?
How do I handle the sample before I mail?
What is a Baerman Test?
What is and why do the McMasters Test?
Fecal Occult Blood Test
How soon do I get results?
WORMS! Why check a stool sample?
Only visible worms are tapeworms and roundworms.
Why not just buy a wormer at the store?
When should you test your horse?
Can worms be a problem for me or my family members?
How often should horse, livestock, and pet owners check the stool samples?
My horse tested negative on the first test and I am puzzled because she has not been dewormed since July. She is in a pasture with 3 other horses.
My horse tested negative on the first test, however 1 week later, I mistakenly mailed a second sample from that same horse which showed strongyles. How can this happen?
How can your fecal test results for pets or my horse be more accurate than my veterinarian might produce?
What pets should be tested? Do you test all these pets? People frequently get worms from their pets so test your pet now, especially if you are pregnant!
Is this test accurate?
How long does it take?
How old can the sample be?
Why use our test?
I sent you worms in a plastic bag but still got negative results?
What do I do if my pet has worms?
Why did my sample produce negative results but weeks later was positive for worms?
What are the advantages of this test?
I saw a worm in the sample but you reported the results as negative. How can that be?
What do Tapeworms look like?
How did my pet/horse/ or other animal get tapeworms?
Can worms be a problem for pet owners?
How do I get rid of Tapeworms?
How often should pet owners check the stool samples of their pets?
What Can I do to Establish Good Control Program?
What types of worms can my horse have?
What types of dewomers are available to buy over the counter?

 

 Why do fecal testing vs. just deworming?
1. To check the effectiveness of your dewormer:
a) Each wormer varies in effectiveness from 0-100% to various types of worms
b) More commonly they are 60-95% effective against the 150 different worms of horses
c) Many worms (coccidia, etc.) are not affected by any routine dewormers that you can buy in the store or catalogs.
2. To check effectiveness of your control program:
a)Fecal examinations are effective means of monitoring the most common worms of horses or other types of livestock.
b) Fecal examinations are helpful to identify these worms:
    43 types of large strongyles and small strongyles
    The 3 most common tapeworms (cestodes)
    All types of roundworms, minute stomach worms, anoplocephalam, and phananoplocephala
    The only other significant worms (bots and pinworms) are diagnosed by seeing eggs on the hairs or the anal area.

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 When should you employ a fecal examination?
1) Prior to deworming 7 - 14 days after each deworming.
2) To evaluate pasture control, do a fecal examination on 10-20% of your horses 2-3 times a year and 14 days after deworming. The only way to know that your horse does not have worms is to check the sample.
3) Test Geriatric Horses (more than 12 years) - three to four times per year.
4) Test any horse showing any signs of illness.
5) Any foal as soon as possible, at one month of age, then every one to two months until one year old.
6) Any new horse prior to placement on your farm and then two weeks, six weeks, and twelve weeks after placement.
These are recommendations from the Companion Animal Parasite Council (the leading source of information to veterinarians in America):

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 How do I handle the sample before I mail it?
You collect the sample and mail it to our veterinary lab. The fecal test or equine worm test (horse, cattle, sheep,etc.) only requires 1 tsp. of stool placed in our bags. You must place everything inside the plastic clam shell that we provide and PLACE THE CLAMSHELL INSIDE THE MAILING ENVELOPE!!! Everything must pass through postal machines and feces gets squeezed out of the bags UNLESS they are inside the clamshell. Please carefully print or type all your contact info!!!!

Place the sample and completed lab form (the entire sheet) inside the plastic clam shell! This is an absolute requirement by the USPO to allow USPO machine processing. We process the sample within 24 hours of receipt. Mail Sun-Tues, if possible, so we can receive it on M-F.    Secure 1-2 teaspoons of feces and place inside 2 plastic/zip lock bags so it does not leak. Submit an additional 1-2 teaspoons of feces if you want us to do either or both McMaster’s or Baerman test. Label the bag(s) with your name, horse's name, date, and serial number (found on back next to bar code). Complete the lab form (one/horse). You must include the entire form.
If you observe actual live worms, include the worms in a separate set of 2 small bags with 4-6 drops of water. Please note on the top of the lab form “live worms included” and label the bag with worms in it.
We offer the modified McMasters technique which is a detailed qualitative and quantitative test which provides a specific count of worm eggs/gram of feces for only $15.00. You should request the McMaster the first time you test your horse. Every horse using your stable or sharing the pasture should be tested. If your horse was positive (resistant) you should use the McMaster each and every time until the sample is negative 2 consecutive times. Subsequent to that and if your horses sample continue to be negative just request the EQUINE Worm fecal test.
We do offer special volume prices to stables/breeders, etc. who purchase 12 or more tests at a time. Our studies show that 50% of those using our program have horses consistently free of worms within 1 yr. Use this test to make an assessment of your progress in the control/elimination of worms from your heard and pastures and to assess which pastures produce the worse problems.  
We can also perform the Baerman Technique for lung worms  for an additional $18 payment.
How soon do I get results? Perfect Pet Products calls the day the test is processed then sends fast written results. We process the tests at our veterinary lab within 24 hours of receipt of the sample and call you the same day. We also send written results via e-mail, fax, or mail with additional and helpful information on what. Please carefully print or type all your contact info!!!!
Do I need to send as Fedex or Priority?  If we get the sample within 7 days our results are the same as your veterinary would produce or better. Most customers use first class USPO mail. Please attach 5 stamps to be sure there are no delays due to lack of proper fees. 20% of our customers mail via Fedex, or Priority Mail because they want more immediate results. Please be aware that it sometimes takes 2-4 days to get the samples regardless. This is an absolute requirement by the USPO to allow USPO machine processing. We process the sample within 24 hours of receipt. Mail Sun-Tues, if possible, so we can receive it on M-F. Please carefully print or type all your contact info!
What do I do if I see live worms? If you observe actual live worms, include the worms in a separate set of 2 small bags with 4-6 drops of water. Please note on the top of the lab form “live worms included” and label the bag with worms in it. Please be aware that many times these are maggots or worms from the ground.

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 What is a Baerman Test?
  This is a test to use if your horse has any respiratory disease or seems to be winded too easily. It is a test for lung worms. We use the fecal sample to detect the actual live (larvae) lung worms. We perform the Baerman Technique for lung worms for an additional $18 payment-just mark the form and include payments or your credit card information.

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 What is and why do the McMasters Test?
The modified McMasters technique which is a detailed qualitative and quantitative test that provides a specific count of worm eggs/gram of feces for only $15.00. You should request the McMaster the first time you test your horse. Every horse using your stable or sharing the pasture should be tested for worms using the McMasters. If your horse was positive (resistant) you should use the McMaster each and every time until the sample is negative TWO consecutive times. Subsequent to that, and if your horses sample continues to be negative, just request the EQUINE WORM fecal test.

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 Fecal Occult Blood Test for Horse Owners
If your horse is a picky eater or doesn't maintain weight, ulcers and other GI issues may be the underlying cause. Digestive issues can affect your horse's attitude and behavior as well. If your horse is withdrawn in his stall, is "girthy", or rebels in training, these may be external signs of internal discomfort. Even the horse's performance ability can be affected. WE often accept these behaviors as limitations of the horse's natural ability or attitude.
  • Knowing if Your Horse is Suffering is the First Step
    • Research published in 2005 showed the 88% of performance horses have stomach ulcers and 63% have ulcers in the colon. In all, 97% of the horses in the study had some type of ulcer. With the incidence of ulcers in horses this high, there's a good chance that your horse could be suffering from this condition.
    • Knowing if your horse is suffering from ulcers or other digestive tract conditions is the first step in managing its GI health. The Occult Blood Test will help diagnose underlying conditions or other serious GI problems, including both gastric and colonic ulcers.
  • Improving the Ability to Diagnose GI Conditions
    • It's important that you make a diagnosis as quickly as possible. Unfortunately, existing common methods of diagnosing digestive tract conditions are limited. Gastric endoscopy is reliable, but costly, and few veterinarians possess a 3-meter endoscope. Further, endoscopy cannot reach the hindgut to help in the diagnosis of colonic ulcers.
    • Many veterinarians and owners alike rely on symptoms to guide their diagnosis. But this approach is hindered by the fact that symptoms typically associated with digestive tract injury may also be associated with a variety of other conditions. And using treatment as diagnosis requires incurring an expense while waiting days, or even weeks, to determine if the course of action was the right one.
    • A Fecal Occult Test is an important screening test to aid in prevention and early detection, by providing objective data that indicates issues throughout the GI tract in just minutes.
  • How an Early Diagnosis Can Help
    • Early screening may lead to prevention and early detection. A Fecal Occult Blood Test is the first way to screen for ulcers, and other bleeding disorders, cancer, and polyps (the cancer which is too small to be visible).
  • How Often Should Horse or Livestock be Tested?
    • This test should be conducted as many times (usually 2-4 times) to get consistent results.
      Ingestion of non digestible materials such as metals, pins, wood, cloth, irritating chemicals, poisonous plants or irritating drugs (NSAIDs) by any horse or livestock may cause irritation or ulcers leading to blood loss. This will cause the Fecal Occult Blood Test to be positive. These conditions may heal on their own causing results to alternate from positive to negative and then back to positive again as the eating habits vary.
    • If the results are consistently negative this is a significant indication of the lack of disease in your animal.
    • If the test is consistently positive, and consistently negative for worms, then your horse or livestock may have a significant bleeding disorder. You should contact your veterinarian immediately. Used properly, this test can be a helpful diagnostic screening aid to early detection.
  • Collecting a Sample
    • A Fecal Occult Blood Test is a non-invasive diagnostic aid that measures trace amount of blood in the manure. Simply collect 1-2 tsp of fresh manure and mail to our Veterinary Lab.
    • If this test is consistently positive (after 2-3 tests), has a strong positive response, or if your horse is in poor condition you should contact a veterinarian immediately.

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 How soon do I get results?
We process the tests at our veterinary lab within 24 hours of receipt of the sample and call you the same day. We also send written results via e-mail, fax, or mail with additional and helpful information. Please carefully print or type all your contact info!!!!

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 WORMS! Why check a stool sample?
Horses are victims of many internal parasites. The most common are roundworms, stomach worms, bots, strongyles, pinworms, threadworms, coccidia, and tapeworms. Nearly all of these worms require a microscopic fecal examination to detect the worms. Pinworms and tapeworms occasionally (but rarely) can be identified by seeing eggs or segments with the human eye. Many horses have a low grade worm load, but over time most worm infestations cause any/all of these symptoms: bloody stools, weight loss, tail rubbing, anal itching, behavioral problems, diarrhea, constipation, anemia, gastritis, skin lesions, conjunctivitis, and general poor appearance. Initially, most infestations cause no symptoms. Some worms can be dormant for months or years, then activated in times of stress.

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 The only visible worms are tapeworms and round worms.
Tapeworms are the most commonly seen worm. They appear as small rice like segments (golden yellow) on the hairs by the anus when dried, or as white flat tape like worms when not dried. They do not routinely show up under the microscope. 98% of the time you diagnose tapeworms by seeing them in the stool or attached to the hair. Round worms are white and usually coil up in a circle. They look like spaghetti, but thinner.

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 Why not just buy a wormer at the store?
No one wormer can treat all the different worms. The TEST@HOMEsm fecal test results tell you if your horse has worms and what type, then the sales staff at the store will suggest a specific medication to completely eliminate/control that parasite. Not all worms respond to a single dose of wormer so multiple doses may be suggested. No wormer is 100% effective on all types of worms. In fact, the removal rate of each wormer varies for 20-100% on any given worm. Many times your horse has several worms and the wormer that you use is 95% effective for one type, yet only 72% effective for another type, so you never really rid your horse of either worm. You then continue to spend $10-$30 every 1 -3 months for wormers that are only partially effective.

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 When should you test your horse?
1) As soon as you get a new horse
2) Prior to and 14 days after worming
3) Before a horse comes into your stall
4) Any foals
5) Prior to breeding
6) To monitor each horse or pasture
7) All pregnant mares. After a horse has a negative result, retest every 1-6 months until negative 2 consecutive times.
For difficult to diagnose cases collect 1 teaspoon of stool from 5 different days, mix together, place 1-2 teaspoons of the mixture into 2 bags, and submit as one test. Freeze each sample until you mail.

Can worms be a problem for me or my family members?
Ascarids, hookworms, and whipworms are the most common intestinal nematodes in companion animals. Ascarids(roundworms) and hookworms in pets, horses, and other livestock are a significant cause of zoonotic disease. Several tapeworms can also cause zoonotic infections. Environmental transmission stages (contact with other animals stool/feces) are a source of infection for pets, horses, other livestock, and humans.

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 How often should horse, livestock, and pet owners check the stool samples?
 
Appropriately conducted fecal examinations should be performed:

  •     Three to four times during the first year of life or first year of testing
  •     Two to four times per year after the first year of testing in mature/adult animals, depending on patient health and lifestyle factors.
  •     Continue the use of wormers / anthelmintic administration at least one to two times until you are certain that your stable, pasture, etc are not a source of reinfestation. Horses are  often serially reinfected via nursing and from eggs in the environment (stable, pasture, etc) and horses often harbor parasite larvae in migration that later mature and commence egg laying.
  •     Intestinal parasite infections in all horses, pets, especially foals, puppies and kittens may cause serious illness or even death before a diagnosis is possible so check their stool (feces) as soon as possible by fecal examination.
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 My horse tested negative on the first test and I am puzzled because she has not been dewormed since July. She is in a pasture with 3 other horses.

Your horse is very likely negative. You need at least 2 consecutive negative test results to be more certain. Not all horses are equally susceptible or have worms. However, your horse could have only a small load of worms, the worms present are of the same sex, or have only young less developed larval stages (therefore have not matured enough to produce eggs) which is what we see on our microscopic evaluations.
You need to retest all of your horses in 1 month to make sure each horse is negative (did not have the eggs in the larva stage) and therefore a source of re-infestation. If any of your horses are positive, worm all your horses again, then retest all the horses in 1 month. Request the McMaster Test on all positive horses so you will obtain the egg count which is helpful to determine which wormers work best (especially in resistant horses). If that test is negative then retest 2 months later, then test 4 months later, and finally 2-3 times each subsequent year to be sure that your horse remains free of these parasitic and costly worms. If  you travel outside of your pasture or others horses with worms come into your pasture, you need to realize that there are chances for contamination from other horses. Tell the other owners of horses who share your stable or pasture to test their horses at the same time. The goal is to reduce the load or eliminate worms from your horse and all other horses that share the same facilities. Ultimately, you would like to rid the pasture of the problem. 30 years ago pet owners were confronted with the same problems, however, because of fecal worm testing pets who follow standard veterinary care protocols do not have worms and no longer are “wormed once a month”. Prior to 30 years ago, all pet owners were told to “worm once a month”—which is much like the state of equine care now. You can insure that your horse is free of parasites and be at their peak performance. You should still use Ivermectin, or another dewormer once or twice a year until you are certain that your horse is free of worms and will not re-infest itself in the pasture. If you have stomach bots or tapeworms, you need to continue to treat for those worms, since they do not appear on a routine fecal.

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 My horse tested negative on the first test, however 1 week later, I mistakenly mailed a second sample from that same horse which showed strongyles. How can this happen?
 
Assuming that you send in the correct sample from that same horse, this is not a rare occurrence, but not common either. No one has done enough research to prove the frequency, but all university professors and drug company experts feel that, with these rare occurrences, fecal worm tests sent through the mail, UPS, etc. are accurate.

    Horses can shed worms in the stool on some days and then other days shed none. This usually will happen when there is a small number of worms, or if the worms are young and produce only a few eggs, or if they are mostly of one sex. Fortunately this is a very low incidence problem.
    If this has happened to any of your horses, then in the future you should collect a tsp of sample from 2-4 separate stool samples, that day and the following day, but combine those 2-4 tsps into one sample that you mail. The best solution is to test more often.
    Additional suggestions: Others have suggested that you collect the sample in the morning since there may be a higher number of eggs shed, but this is unproven. There are many other suggestions of when to collect the sample to be more certain that a negative test result is truly negative, but all are unproven.

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 How can your fecal test results for pets or my horse be more accurate than my veterinarian might produce?

Our fecal testing is more accurate than most veterinarians since we either centrifuge and/or let the stool sample concentrate for 1-4 hours vs. 10 minutes at the veterinary facility.  We also use a better and more expensive concentrating solution which produces far more eggs per gram of fecal sample (nearly twice as many) and therefore a much more accurate result. We do a very high volume of these test and we take pride in performing highly accurate results. In fact our single biggest complaint is “Why didn’t my veterinarian find these worms”.

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 What pets should be tested? Do you test all these pets?

Since any pet can harbor worms and since many of these worms can infest your pet, your child, or yourself, you should test them all. The only way you can know is to test the stool. You cannot visually see most worms that pets harbor. Most pets have worms and should be checked yearly. They acquire worms after walking on soil or grass, then lick their feet ingesting worm eggs. This can occur anywhere, at any time, since stray dogs, cats, rabbits, or wild birds, etc. are everywhere and most times do have worms. You have no way to prevent the exposures your pets have each day. We test all pets including dogs, cats, rabbits, birds, reptiles, turtles, pigs, chickens, sheep, goats, etc. Every pet except a fish!!

People frequently get worms from their pets so test your pet now, especially if you are pregnant!

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 Is this test accurate?
 
This fecal test is as accurate as most veterinary hospitals, since we use a much more effective concentrating fluid than most animal hospitals and allow 1-4 hours of time to concentrate or centrifuge.

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 How long does it take?
 
We process the test within 24 hours of receipt, and call you with the results. We mail or email the written report within 7 days. It is best to send the samples on Sunday or Monday, in case the USPO delays the shipment.

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 How old can the sample be?
 
It is better to send a fresh sample, but the sample can be as old as 7 days when we process it to get reliable results. Your veterinarian and I need fresh samples only if we are checking for protozoan (Giardia) parasites. It is extremely difficult and rare that we can diagnose Giardia on a normal fecal sample, so reading a 5-7 day old sample produces the same results as your Vet would produce, in fact since we centrifuge the samples or let them concentrate 1-4 hours our results are at least 50% more reliable.

 
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 Why use our test?

It is the ULTIMATE IN CONVENIENCE and is SIMPLE, EASY, AND AFFORDABLE.

This is a prepaid fecal (stool) worm test that the pet owner uses to check for the 4-6 parasites found in the stool, some of which are diseases in people as well. We help pet owners know: 1) if their pet has worms, 2) what specific dewormers to buy, and 3) whether the dewormers worked (pet owners retest 2 weeks after deworming and then 1 mo. later). Our lab can assure you that your pet is free of worms. All pets can safely be dewormed with OTC dewormers if you know what to use and we help you to know. You just take our written lab report to the store and look for the one that treats your pet's type of worms.

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 I sent you worms in a plastic bag but still got negative results?


Most likely the worms you put in the bag disintegrated in the bag - if there is too much water (you only need 2-3 drops of water and 2-3 drops of alcohol) or the worms are tapeworms. Nearly all of the worms that you can see in the samples of any pet are either roundworms (which are round) or tapeworms (which are flat). Roundworms rarely disintegrate, so the probability of what you mailed to use being tapeworms is 98-99%. If you like you can send us another sample of the worm, enclosed in two tightly sealed bags-add 3 drops of alcohol and 3 drops of water to the worm to prevent drying and disintegration. Please include a check for $18 or your credit card data to charge your card for $18. We do the best we can with the samples provided. These issues are common in our veterinary hospital even with the freshest of samples. Please indicate in your letter and on the bag why you are sending the sample. We do our best to solve your pet's problems.

Tapeworms are most commonly diagnosed by observation of small rice like (golden yellow) segments on the hairs by the anus, when dried, or as white to beige flat tape like worm segments when not dried. They do not routinely show up under the microscope. 98% of the time they can only be diagnosed only by seeing them grossly (with your eye) in the stool or attached to the hair. Roundworms are white to beige and usually coil up in a circle. They look like spaghetti, but are thinner. They do not disintegrate in the bag. In older animals and especially young animals, round worms may not be detected via the fecal test when the round worms have not reached sexual maturity and are not yet producing roundworm eggs. In many cases especially cats, there may only be several worms in the gut and not enough to produce eggs at all times, or they may be all of one sex and so do not produce eggs; so the sample cannot render a positive result, even though that pet has worms. The final cause of seeing a worm in samples, yet producing a negative result, especially if it has been picked up from the soil/grass, especially when it is warm outside, is the presence of maggots (produced from fly eggs) or various soil parasites which are not from the dog but crawl on to the stool sample. If you still are concerned of the results, purchase another test, collect a teaspoon of sample from 3-5 samples over 1-2 days and place them in a double bagged container, then place all contents plus the sample, in our clamshell. Keep the samples refrigerated until you have collected them all and are ready to send to us. Send on a Sunday thru Tuesday directly to our Veterinary hospital at: Perfect Pet Products, LLC, 2544 Austin Trail, St Joseph, MI 49085.

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 What do I do if my horse has worms?
 
We tell you which worms your pet has. The staff of the catalog companies or store can help you decide which OTC dewormers to purchase and what steps to take in your house or yard to prevent re-infestation. SAVE at least 50% on dewormers from the store, but more importantly, finally rid your pet and your yard/home of worms. More than 90% of the pets with worms can be treated with OTC dewormers.

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 What animals do we test for worms?

We test all species of pet or livestock (except for fish). Animals include: dogs, cats, horses, reptiles, birds, rabbits, goats, sheep, cattle, etc.

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 Why did my sample produce negative results but weeks later was positive for worms?

In many cases especially cats, there may only be several worms in the gut and not enough to produce eggs at all times, or they may be all of one sex and so do not produce eggs; so the sample cannot render a positive result, even though that pet has worms.

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 What are the advantages of this test?

 

1. CONVENIENCE. You save time.
2. SAVE UP TO 50% ON DEWORMERS. You will be able to buy most dewormers at the store, or by catalog, and save at least 50%. You will know which specific dewormers to buy.
3. SAVE 10-25% on the cost of a fecal exam and in many cases $40-65 on an exam.
4. ACCURATE RESULTS - From a veterinary lab. We allow the sample to concentrate at least 4 hours. In addition, we centrifuge any samples that are questionable.
5. FINALLY, YOU WILL REALIZE WHICH DEWORMER TO BUY.
We make it easy for you to buy the right wormer. You can use the correct wormer and then recheck to be sure that your pet is free of worms, all without leaving your home

 
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 I saw a worm in the sample but you reported the results as negative. How can that be?


Most likely the worms you put in the bag disintegrated in the bag - if there is too much water. (You only need 2-4 drops of water). However, roundworms rarely disintegrate, so the probability of it being tapeworms is 95-99%. If you like you can send us another sample of the worm, enclosed in two tightly sealed bags-add 2 drops of alcohol and 2 drops of water to the worm to prevent drying and disintegration. Please include a check for $18 or your credit card data to charge you card for $18. We do the best we can with the samples provided. These issues are common in all veterinary hospitals, even with the freshest of samples.
Tapeworms and round worms are the only worms visible to the eye that are parasites to you or your pet. Tapeworms are most commonly diagnosed by observation of small rice like (golden yellow) segments on the hairs by the anus, when dried, or as white to beige flat tape like worm segments when not dried. They do not routinely show up under the microscope. 98% of the time they can only be diagnosed by seeing them grossly (with you eye) in the stool or attached to the hair.
Roundworms are white to beige and usually coil up in a circle. They look like spaghetti, but are thinner. In older animals and especially young animals, round worms may not be detected via the fecal test when the round worms have not reached sexual maturity and are not yet producing roundworm eggs.
In many cases especially cats, there may only be several worms in the gut and not enough to produce eggs at all times, or they may be all of one sex and so do not produce eggs; so the sample cannot render a positive result, even though that pet has worms.
The final cause of seeing a worm in samples, yet producing a negative result, especially if it has been picked up from the soil/grass, especially when it is warm outside, is the presence of maggots (produced from fly eggs) or various soil parasites which are not from the dog but crawl on to the stool sample.
If you still are concerned of the results, purchase another test, collect a teaspoon of sample from 3-5 samples over 1-2 days and place them in on double bagged container, then place all contents plus the sample, in our clamshell. Keep the samples refrigerated until you are ready to send all samples to us.Send on a Sunday thru Tuesday directly to our Veterinary hospital at: Perfect pet products, LLC 2544 Austin Trail St. Joseph, MI 49085

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 What do Tapeworms look like?
  Tapeworms and round worms are the only worms visible to the eye that are parasites to you or your pet. Tapeworms are most commonly diagnosed by observation of small rice like (golden yellow) segments on the hairs by the anus, when dried, or as white to beige flat tape like worm segments when not dried. The eggs that we need to diagnose the presence of worms are not produced and therefore do not routinely show up under the microscope.

 
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 How did my pet/horse/ or other animal get tapeworms?
  Tapeworms are spread by infestation of fleas and ingestion of flea eggs when licking, biting, or chewing at themselves, or ingestion of small animals such as rabbits. Animals continue to re-infest themselves every 6-12 weeks unless you rid it of the tapeworms, and eliminate the source.

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 Can worms be a problem for pet owners?
  Absolutely! This is why everyone should check their pets at least 1-2 times per year, EVEN if inside, since you can track the worm eggs in on your shoes. The more your pet is outside the more often you should test the stool sample. Also, if you have children, immune compromised individuals, or seniors in your household you should test more often (every 2-4 months).

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 Can worms be a problem for me or my family members?
Recommendations of the Companion Animal Parasite Council (the leading source of information to veterinarians in America state):
"Ascarids, hookworms, and whipworms are the most common intestinal nematodes in companion animals. Ascarids (roundworms) and hookworms are a significant cause of zoonotic disease. Several tapeworms of dogs and cats can also cause zoonotic infections. Environmental transmission stages (contact with other animals stool/feces) are a source of infection for pets and humans."

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 How do I get rid of Tapeworms?
  Tapeworms will continue to re-infest your pet unless you get rid of the source by treat ALL of your pets for fleas or keep them from hunting outside, especially for rabbits. To treat the tape worms you should contact the company that you bought the test kit from or buy over the counter de-wormers for tapeworms sold at most pet/farm supply stores or call your veterinarian and ask for a tapeworm product. (Most veterinarians will prescribe a product without an exam). You should always first check the fecal sample for which worms your pet has then deworm for the correct type of worm.

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 How often should pet owners check the stool samples of their pets?
  Recommendations of the Companion Animal Parasite Council (the leading source of information to veterinarians in America) states that appropriately conducted fecal examinations should be performed:
    Two to four times during the first year of life (may be associated with vaccine schedule);
    One to two times per year in adult pets, depending on patient health and lifestyle factors.
    Puppies and kittens require more frequent anthelmintic administration than adult dogs and cats, because: 1) they often are serially re-infected via nursing and from the environment, and 2) they often harbor parasite larvae in migration that later mature and commence egg laying.
    Intestinal parasite infections in puppies and kittens may cause serious illness or even death before a diagnosis is possible so check their stool (feces) as soon as possible by fecal examination.

 
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 Why should I test my cat, dog or small pocket pet for fecal worms?
  Nearly all puppies and kittens have worms. At least 20% of adult dogs have worms. The most common worms (hookworms and roundworms) are contagious to people, especially children. In some countries 80% of the people have worms. Pregnant women and mothers should be especially careful with their pets stool. There are 7 common worms of animals. Only 2 of them are visible to the human eye. The most serious worms are invisible to your eye. Use this at home worm test for the following reasons:
1. SAVE 20-50% on our stool test.
2. Save 50% or more on dewormers.
3. Extremely accurate test results!
4. Convenient, just mail to our laboratory.
5. Receive written results-you will know which OTC dewormers to use-save on dewormers!
6. Many worms of pets infect humans. If you have children, test each of your pets.

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 What Can I Do to Establish Good Control Program?

  Worm control is an ongoing process that needs your constant attention, but you need the factual information that only a fecal examination can provide.
Steps to customize and improve your worming program:
  1) Initial Assessment of your farm history, age and use of your horse, management and housing of your horse, pasture use, and previous deworming program.
  2) Evaluation of your current worming program by doing frequent fecal examinations. Fecal examinations provide you with answers to these questions:
      a) Which worm or worm combinations are present in each horse.
      b) By knowing which worms are present, you can evaluate which dewormers to use that are most effective.
      c) You can determine which OTC dewormers are most cost effective, helping you to save on the type of dewormers.
      d) You can potentially reduce the frequency of dewormers, improve the health of your horse and save $$.
      e) Degree of pasture contamination which will vary from each pasture.
      f) Transmission potential which varies with each pasture.
 
3) Management - The only way to assess how effective your clean-up procedures are by frequent fecal examinations. Some worms are easily removed, however others, like roundworms, can live two to three years in the ground, even through the harshest winters.
  4) Choice and appropriate administration of dewormers are crucial for effective programs. With the help of the fecal examination you can specifically use the most effective dewormers, the most appropriate dosages of that dewormer and specifically schedule your deworming for the year.
  5) A fecal examination will allow you to adjust your deworming administration intervals (every 6-12 weeks), seasonal or daily deworming to assess the need for chemicals or the need to rotate dewormers.
  6) Ongoing monitoring is important to determine the effectiveness of your health program. The only way to monitor these factors is with a fecal examination.
7) The best health programs utilize a fecal examination prior to worming to determine if your horses are on the correct interval schedule. Then another fecal exam 7-14 days after worming. Repeat this process several times until you have established a pattern of what works and the frequency required.
  You will still need to use a dewormer; however you will be more knowledgeable and confident about the total health of your horse. Eventually, as all or nearly all horse owners follow the lead, all horses will benefit and be healthier with little or no resistance.
  You will benefit from reduced costs of feed, dewormers, and other drugs.


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 What types of worms can my horse have?

Large Strongyle Worms
These nematode worms are a real problem for the horse, being more damaging than the small strongyles.
Other Names
Sometimes they are also known as blood worms and also red worms due to being red in color.
Description
Most large Strongyle types are around half to two inches in length and most are either white or red in color.
Horses At Risk
All horses at potentially at risk, with very young horses being most at risk. Infection can also occur where there are several horses all over grazing a pasture.
Strongyle Infection
    · A horse who is already infected with strongyle worms will pass out strongyle eggs in their droppings.
    · The strongyle eggs then hatch into the infective stage of larvae within one to three weeks depending on the climate conditions.
    · The eggs can be found in the soil, on blades of grass, water troughs and on dew drops on blades of grass.
    · The eggs are then swallowed by another horse and start to migrate towards the intestines.
Symptoms
    · Diarrhea
    · Weight loss
    · Anemia
    · Colic
    · Abdominal discomfort
    · Enteritis
    · Death in some cases
Diagnosis
By having an EQUINE WORM ~TEST @ HOME done identification of the worm eggs will be possible. Identification is only possible through an EQUINE WORM ~TEST @ HOME.
Prevention
    · The use of worming products is essential to help protect your horse, ask your veterinarian for a worming schedule to help protect your horse from the threat of these and other worms.
    Regular pasture maintenance, such as harrowing and removing droppings, this will help to reduce the amount of faeces and larvae from the fields, it should be remembered that larvae can last for 1 to 5 weeks and in certain moist conditions for up to 2 years.
    · Where possible try not to have too many horses overgrazing one area as this increases the amount of droppings and therefore the possibility for re-infection.
Three Types Of Large Strongyle Worms
The three most common types of large strongyle worms are Strongylus vulgaris, Strongylus edentatus and Strongylus equinus
    Strongylus Vulgaris
o After the eggs are eaten by the horse they travel towards the small intestine and then onto the large intestine where the larvae enter the caecum and continue to develop.
o The larvae then migrate towards the blood vessels and it is this action that often causes inflammation and blood clots to form. This action then leads to the blood clots blocking the flow of blood to parts of the intestine and thus causes parts of the bowel to die due to lack of oxygen and nutrients.
o Due to the blood loss that occurs horses affected with Strongylus vulgaris are often anemic.
o After several months the larvae reenter the caecum and colon and become adults and start to produce eggs.
o These eggs are then passed out along with the droppings and the cycle can begin again.
    Strongylus edentatus
o After being eaton by the horse the eggs enter the digestive system.
o When the larvae reach the large intestine they begin to burrow into the gut wall causing inflammation.
o From the gut wall they then enter the veins that lead towards the liver.
o The veins then lead towards to liver and it is here that the larvae continue to develop for about 8 weeks.
o They then leave the liver and go to other parts of the large intestine before eventually returning to the caecum as adults.
o As adults they produce eggs and the process begins again.
    Strongylus equinus
o Once eaten the larvae travel towards the small intestine and then onto the caecum in the large intestine.
o The larvae burrow into the gut wall and pass into the veins.
o The larvae then travel around the abdomen in particular to the liver and pancreas.
o After around 9 months the larvae return to the caecum as egg producing adults.
Small Strongyles
These are a type of nematode worms and in some ways are very similar to that of the large strongyle worm.
Other Names
They are also known as Cyathostomes.
Description
Small strongyle worms are round in circumference and thread like in appearance.
Horses At Risk
All horses at potentially at risk, with very young horses being most at risk. Infection can also occur where there are several horses all over grazing a pasture.
Small Strongyle Infection
    · A horse who is already infected with small strongyle worms will pass out strongyle eggs in their droppings.
    · The strongyle eggs then hatch into the infective stage of larvae within one to three weeks depending on the climate conditions.
    · The eggs can be found in the soil, on blades of grass, water troughs and on dew drops on blades of grass.
    · The eggs are then swallowed by another horse and start to migrate towards the intestines.
    · When the larvae enter the large intestine they immediately invade the gut lining which is also called the mucosa.
    · It is here that scar tissue forms around the larvae protecting the larvae from the horses immune responses and providing it with a safe environment to mature. The horse will suffer very little inflammation of the gut lining from the larvae at this stage.
    · The egg is now known as encysted stage larvae.
    · When the larvae are ready to leave the gut lining they mature into adults and begin to lay their own eggs which get passed out with the droppings and begin the cycle again.
Symptoms
    · Diarrhea
    · Weight loss
    · Anemia
    · Colic
    · Abdominal discomfort
     Inflammation of the gut lining occurs when the cyst ruptures
Tissues around the cysts also hemorrhage when the cysts rupture.
    · Poor or dull coat
    · Horses are often very lethargic.
Diagnosis
By having an EQUINE WORM ~TEST @ HOME done identification of the worm eggs will be possible. Identification is only possible through an EQUINE WORM ~TEST @ HOME.
Prevention
    ·The use of worming products is essential to help protect your horse, ask your veterinarian for a worming schedule to help protect your horse from the threat of these and other worms.
    ·Regular pasture maintenance, such as harrowing and removing droppings, will help to reduce the amount of faeces and larvae from the fields, it should be remembered that larvae can last for 1 to 5 weeks and in certain moist conditions for up to 2 years.
    ·Where possible try not to have too many horses overgrazing one area as this increases the amount of droppings and therefore the possibility for re-infection.
Tapeworm
Tapeworms are a type of Cestodes and are potentially very dangerous to horses and require careful management to keep them under control.
Other Names
They are also known as a type of Cestodes.
Three Main Types Of Tapeworm
    · Anoplocephala perfoliata
    · Anoplocephala magna
    · Anoplocephaloides mamillana
Description
Tapeworms are between 10cm to 30cm long are white in color
Tapeworm Infection
    · Adult Tapeworm within an infected horse shed out egg containing segments.
    · These egg segments can survive for several months and wait to be eaten by orbited mites.
    · It is within these mites that the eggs continue to develop and become known as immature infective tapeworm, this process can take a couple of months.
    · When the orbited mite is eaten by the horse the infective immature Tapeworm can then carry on with their development into adulthood which takes around 10 weeks to complete.
    · The Tapeworm attach themselves to the gut wall at the ileocaecal junction of the small and the large intestine.
    · As adults they then shed their egg segments out with the horses droppings and the cycle begins again.
Horses At Risk
All horses are at risk from Tapeworms.
Diagnosis
Tapeworms are rarely diagnosed via an EQUINE WORM ~TEST @ HOME since eggs are only seen in the feces. Diagnosis is most commonly made by visualizing the egg segments in the stool or on the hair of the tail.
Symptoms
    · Bowel irritation
    · Weight loss
    · Colic
o The blocking of blood vessels to the intestines can cause spasmodic colic which in some cases can prove fatal to the horse.
o Ileal Impaction can be caused from an obstruction by Tapeworm.
o Intususseption - This is where the intestine telescopes in on itself causing the horse a great deal of pain.
    · Abdominal discomfort - This can be due to rupture or twisting of the intestine.
    · Horses are often very lethargic.
    · Horses are often very depressed.
Tapeworm Treatment And Prevention
    · The use of worming products is essential to help protect your horse, ask your veterinarian for a worming schedule to help protect your horse from the threat of these and other worms.
    · Control of Tapeworm with specific wormers is recommended around the months of March and April and then again during September and October.
Roundworm
Ascarids or Roundworms are a parasite that requires a careful management program in order to best help to protect your horse.
Other Names
They are also known as Ascarids and Parascaris equorum.
Description
Ascarids or roundworms are around 40 centimetres in length when fully mature and white in color.
Diagnosis
By having an EQUINE WORM ~TEST @ HOME done identification of the worm eggs will be possible. Identification is only possible through an EQUINE WORM ~TEST @ HOME.
Horses At Risk
All horses at potentially at risk, with foals who are 6 months old or younger being most at risk. Infection can also occur where there are several horses all over grazing a pasture.
Ascarid or Roundworm Infection
    · Horses already infected with Roundworms release eggs along with their droppings into the field causing contamination.
    · These eggs then become larvae and wait to be eaten by another horse.
    · The larvae can be found on dew drops on the blades of grass and in the soil making them easy to be picked up when the horse eats.
    · Once eaten the larvae travel towards the small intestine and then onto the large intestine.
    · In the Large intestine they burrow into the wall lining and then into the blood stream.
    · The blood stream carries the larvae to the liver and lungs of the horse.
    · When the larvae reach the lungs the horse will cough them up and then re swallow them.
    · The larvae continue to mature in the small intestines where they become egg laying adults.
    · The eggs are then passed out along with the horses droppings and the cycle begins again.
Symptoms
    · Diarrhea
    · Weight loss
    · Anemia
    · Colic
    · Abdominal discomfort
    · Poor or dull coat
    · Horses are often very lethargic.
    · Coughing
    · Increase in body temperature.
    · Respiratory infections.
Prevention
    · The use of worming products is essential to help protect your horse, ask your veterinarian for a worming schedule to help protect your horse from the threat of these and other worms.
    · Regular pasture maintenance, such as harrowing and removing droppings, will help to reduce the amount of faeces and larvae from the fields, it should be remembered that larvae can last for 1 to 5 weeks and in certain moist conditions for up to 2 years.
    · Where possible try not to have too many horses overgrazing one area as this increases the amount of droppings and therefore the possibility for re-infection.
Bots - Bot Flies
Bots are a type of fly and not a worm, there eggs and larvae do however give similar cause for concern and therefore still need adequate treatment in order to control the burden.
Other Names
They are also known as Gasterophilus.
Description
Bot eggs can be spotted easily during the summer months by looking on your horses legs, jaw, chest and shoulder they can be seen as yellow eggs.
Horses At Risk
All horses are potentially at risk from Bot flies.
Bot Flies
    · The Female bot fly lays eggs onto the horses coat usually on the legs, shoulders and neck of the horse during the summer months.
    · The horse licks the eggs off their coat which then enter the horses mouth where they hatch and burrow into the horses gums.
    · The larvae attach to the mucus lining of the horses stomach where they remain over the winter months.
    · The larvae then pass out along with the droppings of the horse.
    · The larvae then burrow into the ground where they mature into adults.
    · As adults the females then lay eggs on the horses coat and so the process begins again.
Symptoms
    · Inflammation of the mouth
    · Stomach irritation
    · Stomach ulcers
    · Weight loss
    · Colic
    · Abdominal discomfort
    · Horses are often very lethargic.
Prevention
    · Regularly removing bot eggs from the horses coat will help to reduce the amount of eggs swallowed by the horse.
    · Using of fly sprays can also help to deter flies.
    · The use of worming products is essential to help protect your horse, ask your veterinarian for a worming schedule to help protect your horse from the threat of these and other worms.
Diagnosis: No eggs are present in the fleas so the EQUINE WORM ~TEST @ HOME cannot detect.
Intestinal Threadworms
Threadworms are an intestinal parasite that can infect foals as early as four days after birth, by having the mare correctly wormed will greatly help to reduce the worm burden.
Other Names
Threadworms are also known as Strongyloides westeri
Main Type Of Threadworm
    · Intestinal Threadworm
Threadworm Infection
    · Mares can pass on a threadworm infection on to their foals through their milk.
    · The foal picks up threadworm larvae when it is grazing and also through skin contact with the larvae.
    · When larvae enter the horse via the skin they travel towards the lungs of the horse and it is from here that they are coughed up and swallowed and can then progress towards the intestines.
    · When the larvae enter the small intestine they begin to mature into adult threadworm.
    · As adults they are then capable of producing eggs which are released along with the horses droppings.
    · The Threadworm are then able to re infect other grazing horses.
    · This cycle can be completed in around two weeks giving the possibility for a severe infection to take hold in a relatively short space of time.
Description
They are around 1 cm in length and are very fine; like a thread in width.
Horses At Risk
Foals are particularly at risk and can suffer from diarrhea, lethargy, weight loss and lack of growth.
Symptoms
    · Respiratory disorders
    · Coughing
    · Bleeding can also occur in the lungs.
    · Diarrhea
    · Weight loss
    · Colic
    · Dull coat
    · Foals are often very lethargic.
Prevention
    · The use of worming products is essential to help protect your horse, ask your veterinarian for a worming schedule to help protect your foal from the threat of these and other worms.
    · Maintain good pasture management.
Neck Threadworms
Neck Threadworms have an indirect life cycle and require quick and aggressive treatment which your vet will advise you on.
Other Names
Neck Threadworms are also known as Onchocerca. Microfilaria is the name given to the larvae stage.
Description
They are long and coiled in shape with the males being around 7cm in length and females being around 30cm in length.
Threadworm Infection
    · Threadworms have to depend on another organism to get it to the horse.
    · The neck threadworm microfilariae live in the tissue just under the horse's skin and wait to picked up by a biting midge.
    Once inside the midge they develop to the infective larvae stage within approximately 3 weeks.
    · Once at the infective stage, when the midge bites another horse the neck threadworms are able to enter the horses system via the midges bite.
    · The Threadworms then travel to the ligaments in the horses neck and also to the flexor tendons and suspensory ligaments.
    · Threadworms are transmitted by a biting midge, often of the Ceiatopogonidae family.
    · Once the Threadworms have reached the horse they travel to the connective tissue around the head, neck and underbelly of the horses body.
Horses At Risk
All horses are potentially at risk.
Symptoms
    · Sores along the topline
    · Sores along the stomach
    · Sores, irritation and swelling around the eyes
    · Uveitis - This occurs when there are large quantities of dead microfilariae in the eye which causes the dead to give off large amounts of antigens which cause inflammation in the eye.
    · A constant water stream out of the eye or eyes often along with a white or yellow mucous in the eye on a regular basis.
    · Hair loss around the head and neck area.
    · Swelling around Ligaments.
    · Swelling around tendons.
    · Lameness.
    · Lumps under the horses skin on the ligaments.
    · Blindness can occur if the infection around the eye is severe or if treatment is delayed.
Prevention
    · The use of worming products is essential to help protect your horse, ask your veterinarian for a worming schedule to help protect your horse from the threat of these and other worms.
    · If you suspect Threadworm consult your vet immediately to discuss treatment.
    · Maintain good pasture management.
Pinworms
Pinworms can cause great irritation to the horse and therefore require a careful management programme in order to provide your horse with adequate protection.
Other Names
Oxyuris equi
Description
They are brown or dark grey in color with the female Pin worms growing to around 7 to 15 centimetres in length and the males only growing to around 13 mm in length.
Pinworm eggs are a dull-yellowish color and are sometimes found in clusters near the anus of an infected horse or in manure.
Pinworm Infection
    · Pin worm eggs are released with the droppings of an infected horse and contaminate the ground and sometimes water troughs.
    · These eggs are then ingested by another horse when they graze or through drinking.
    · Once eaten the eggs travel through to the horses large intestines and it is from here that the larvae mature into adults.
    · After approximately 5 months the adults can then release their own eggs either into the rectal area or they crawl out of the anal opening and release the eggs on the surrounding skin area.
    · The eggs can actually survive for several months before hatching.
    · Once the eggs do hatch they become infective larvae within a matter of days.
Horses At Risk
All horses are potentially at risk.
Symptoms
    · Lack of appetite.
    · Depression
    · Irritation to the horses anal area.
    · Extreme itching the tail and rump area.
    · Sores and sometimes infection in the anal area.
Prevention
    · Consult with your veterinarian in order to provide your horse with a suitable worming programme.
    · If you suspect Pinworms then consult your veterinarian immediately and discuss a suitable treatment programme.
    · Regular pasture management will help to control the spread of worms.
Hairworms
Hairworms are a particular threat to foals and require a suitable worming programme.
Other Names
Trichostrongylus axei
Description
Hairworms are very thin and measure around half a centimetre in length
Hairworm Infection
    · The eggs are passed out with the horses droppings.
    · The eggs are often found on blades of grass in the pasture, which allows them to be eaten by the horse.
    · Once ingested the eggs start to hatch and the larvae move towards the stomach and to the small intestine.
    · It is in the stomach and small intestine that the eggs mature and grow into adults.
    · The hair worms attack the villi on the stomach lining and damage the capillaries and lymph vessels.
    This action decreases the foals ability to digest food and can also cause internal bleeding which in turn can cause anemia.
    · As adult hairworms they are then able to produce eggs which are passed out in the horses droppings allowing the cycle to start again.
Horses At Risk
Foals are particularly at risk.
Symptoms
    · Gut damage
    · Poor condition
    · Dark colored diarrhea
    · Dehydration
    · Intestinal bleeding
    · Colic
    · Anemia
    · Inability to digest food.
    · Lethargic
Prevention
    · Consult with your veterinarian in order to provide your horse with a suitable worming program.
    · A fecal culture will help you to identify if your horse has hair worms.
    · Maintain good pasture management.
Lungworms
Are a parasite that require careful treatment and quick intervention if they infect your horse or foal.
Other Names
Dictyocaulus arnfieldi
Description
Adult Lungworms are long and thin and can range from 25 to 70mm in length
Life Cycle of a Lungworm Infection
    · Lungworm eggs are passed out in the droppings of infected horses.
    · The eggs travel to the intestines and it is from here that they burrow through the walls of the intestines and enter the circulatory system.
    · Via the circulatory system they enter the lungs and it is here that the most damage is caused.
    The larvae irritate the bronchioles in the horses lungs and often cause a persistent cough and difficulty in breathing as well as a reduced appetite and sense of wellbeing.
    · The larvae mature into adults in the lungs and the female lungworm lay eggs.
    · These eggs are coughed up and re swallowed and leave the horse in the droppings.
Horses At Risk
All horses are potentially at risk, more mature horses develop a resistance to Lungworms, but foals do not posses this immunity and are therefore at risk
Symptoms
    · Persistent cough
    · Parasitic bronchitis
    · Difficulty in breathing
    · Loss of appetite
Prevention
    Where possible separate older horses from young foals
    · Maintain a regular de-worming program.
    · Consult with your veterinary surgeon to ensure that you have an adequate worming program in place.
    · Maintain good pasture management.
  Stomach Worms
Stomach worms can cause both internal and external damage such as abdominal discomfort and what are often caused summer sores. Which are sores that become infected and increase in size preventing the sores from healing.
Other Names
    · Habronema muscae
    · Large-Mouth Stomach Worms
Description
Most stomach worms can grow to around 2.5 cm in length and are white in color.
Stomach Worm Infection
    · Stomach worms need flies to transmit them onto the horse.
    · Fly maggots ingest the stomach worm larvae where they grow into adult stomach worm.
    · If a fly lands on a horses wound then the stomach worm will cause the wound to increase in size and it will seem to never heal, these sorts of wounds are referred to as summer sores.
    · If the horse licks the wound the stomach worm is ingested and it heads towards the stomach where females will lay eggs which are passed out with the horses manure and he cycle begins again.
    · If the fly deposits the stomach worm near to the eyes then it will often cause conjunctivitis.
    · Stomach worms can cause growths to appear in the horses stomach that in turn can cause bleeding and discomfort.
Horses At Risk
All horses are potentially at risk.
Symptoms
    · Summer sores are wounds that become infected with stomach worms and cause the sore to increase in size and prevent it from healing.
    · Conjunctivitis.
    · Weight loss
    · Diarrhea.
    · Lethargy.
    · Skin irritation around the sores.
Prevention
    · The use of worming products is essential to help protect your horse, ask your veterinarian for a worming schedule to help protect your horse from the threat of these and other worms.
    · If you suspect stomach worms consult your vet immediately to discuss treatment.
    · Maintain good pasture management.
  Since this disease is so devastating to the infected horse every horse owner is wise to test every foal and adult at least once every 1-3 years, but especially if your horse is showing any signs of illness – especially respiratory diseases.

 
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 What types of dewormers are available to buy over the counter?
Horse Worming Chemicals
Horse wormers are made up of three main groups of chemicals Macrocyclic Lactones, Tetrahydropirimines and Benzimidazoles.
Contact your veterinary surgeon who will be able to advise you on an appropriate worming program for your horse.
    Macrocyclic Lactones
o Macrocyclic Lactones have the active ingredients Ivermectin and Moxidectin
o Moxidectin based wormers can be used to treat for encysted redworm, small and large strongyles, roundworms, pinworms, hair worms and bots.
o Ivermectin based wormers can be used to treat small strongyles, bots, large strongyles, Pinworms, Roundworm, Lungworm, stomach worms, neck and intestinal threadworm.
    Tetrahydropirimidines
o Tetrahydropirimidines have the active ingredient Pyrantel.
o Pyrantel based wormers can be used for the treatment of Tapeworm in March and September.
    Benzimidazoles
o Benzimidazoles have the active ingredients Fenbendazole, Mebendazole and Oxibendazole.
o A 5 day course of a Fenbendazole based wormer can be used in November and February for the treatment of various stages ofencysted cyathostone larvae.
o Fenbendazole also controls large strongyles, small strongyles, Pinworms and Roundworm.
    · The drug Praziquantel must be used with one of the three chemical groups above in the treatment of Tapeworm and other worms.
Here is an example of how these chemical groups are used during a yearly worming programme:
    September
o The chemical Pyrantel embonate can be used for the treatment of Tapeworm
    Late October or early November
o A 5 day course of Fenbendazole can be used to treat for small Redworm, migrating large redworm larvae, adult redworm and encysted redworm.
    December
o The chemical Ivermectin or Moxidectin can be used for the treatment of Bots as well as for large and small strongyles, roundworms and pinworms for example.
    February
o A 5 day course of Fenbendazole can be used to treat for small Redworm, migrating large redworm larvae, adult redworm and encysted redworm.
    March
o The chemical Pyrantel Embonate can be used for the treatment of Tapeworm.
    April to August is the grazing season
o During the grazing season of April to August choose one chemical group, for example if you chose Macrocyclic Lactones as your chosen group you will be using wormers which contain Ivermectin or Moxidectin at the intervals suggested by the manufacturer during the grazing season.
o The chosen chemical group should be changed each year so for example the following year between April and August your chosen chemical group could be Benzimidazoles so your wormers would contain the ingredients Fenbendazole, Mebendazole or Oxibendazole.
Common names and sources of drugs used for deworming horses 

 

Generic and

Trade

 

 

Class Name

Name

Source

Method

Avermectins

 

 

 

Ivermectin

Eqvalan

Merial

Paste

Milbemycin

 

 

 

Moxidectin

Quest

Ft. Dodge

Oral gel

Benzimidazoles

 

 

 

Fenbendazole

Panacur

Hoechst

Feed, paste, stomach tube

Mebendazole

Telmin

Pitman -Moore

Feed, paste, stomach tube

Mebendazole + trichlorfon

Telmin-B

Pitman-Moore

Feed, paste, stomach tube

Oxfendazole

Benzelmin

Diamond

Feed, stomach tube

Oxibendazole

Anthelcide- EQ

Norden

Feed, paste, stomach tube

Oxibendazole

Equipar

Cooper

Feed, paste, stomach tube

Phenylguanidines

 

 

 

Febantel

Rintal

Haver

Feed, paste, stomach tube

Fenbendazole + trichlorfon

Combotel

Haver

Paste

Imidothiazole

 

 

 

Levamisole + piperazine

Ripercol-Piperazine

Beecham

Stomach tube

Organophosphates

 

 

 

Dichlorvos

Equigard

Squibb

Feed

Dichlorvos

Equigel

Squibb

Paste

Trichlorfon

Combot

Haver

Paste, stomach tube

Piperazines

 

 

 

Piperazine

Various

Various

Stomach tube

Piperazine-carbon disulfide

 

 

 

+ phenothiazine

Parvex Plus

Upjohn

Stomach tube

Piperazine + Phenothiazine

 

 

 

+ trichlorfon

Dyrex, T.F.

Ft. Dodge

Stomach tube

Pyrimidines

 

 

 

Pyrantel

Strongid-T or P

Pfizer

Feed, paste, stomach tube

Pyrantel

Imathal-Equine

Beecham

Feed, stomach tube

Other

 

 

 

Phenothiazine

Various

Various

Feed, stomach tube

Carbon disulfide

Various

Various

Stomach tube

 



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